What Swedish taxonomist created binomial nomenclature? – 2017

What Swedish taxonomist created binomial nomenclature?

Carolus Linnaeus, also called Carl Linnaeus, Swedish Carl von Linné (born May 23, 1707, Råshult, Småland, Sweden—died January 10, 1778, Uppsala) Swedish naturalist and explorer who was the first to frame principles for defining natural genera and species of organisms and to create a uniform system for naming them.

Carl Linnaeus (/lɪˈniːəs, lɪˈneɪəs/; 23 May[note 1] 1707 – 10 January 1778), also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné (Swedish pronunciation: [ˈkɑːɭ ˈfɔnː lɪˈneː] ( listen)), was a Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist, who formalised the modern system of naming organisms called binomial nomenclature. He is known by the epithet “father of modern taxonomy”. Many of his writings were in Latin, and his name is rendered in Latin as Carolus Linnæus (after 1761 Carolus a Linné)

The establishment of universally accepted conventions for the naming of organisms was Linnaeus’ main contribution to taxonomy—his work marks the starting point of consistent use of binomial nomenclature. During the 18th century expansion of natural history knowledge, Linnaeus also developed what became known as the Linnaean taxonomy; the system of scientific classification now widely used in the biological sciences. A previous zoologist Rumphius (1627-1702) had more or less approximated the Linnaean system and his material contributed to the later development of the binomial scientific classification by Linnaeus.

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