Daily Bread for 10.7.16 – 2017

Good morning, Whitewater.

The week in the city ends with cloudy skies and a high of sixty-four. Sunrise is 7 AM and sunset is 6:24 PM, for 11h 23m 37s of daytime. The moon is a waxing crescent with 33.3% of its visible disk illuminated.

Whitewater’s Landmarks Commission is scheduled to meets this morning at 10:30 AM.

On October 7th,  2007, journalist and human rights activist Anna Politkovskaya is murdered:

By Blaues Sofa - Flickr: Anna Politkovskaja im Gespräch mit Christhard Läpple, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20526352
By Blaues Sofa – Flickr: Anna Politkovskaja im Gespräch mit Christhard Läpple, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=20526352

Anna Stepanovna Politkovskaya née Mazepa; 30 August 1958 – 7 October 2006) was a Russian[1] journalist, writer, and human rights activist known for her opposition to the Second Chechen War and President of Russia Vladimir Putin.[3]

Politkovskaya made her reputation reporting from Chechnya.[4] Her post-1999 articles about conditions in Chechnya were turned into several books;[5] Russian readers’ main access to her investigations and publications was through Novaya Gazeta, a Russian newspaper known for its often-critical investigative coverage of Russian political and social affairs. From 2000 onwards, she received numerous international awards for her work. In 2004, she published a personal account, Putin’s Russia.[6]

On 7 October 2006, she was murdered in the elevator (lift) of her block of flats, an assassination that attracted international attention.[7][8][9] In June 2014 five men were sentenced to prison for the murder, but it is still unclear who ordered or paid for the contract killing.[10]

October 7th is Vladimir Putin’s birthday.

On this day in 1774, Wisconsin becomes part of Quebec:

On this date Britain passed the Quebec Act, making Wisconsin part of the province of Quebec. Enacted by George III, the act restored the French form of civil law to the region. The Thirteen Colonies considered the Quebec Act as one of the “Intolerable Acts,” as it nullified Western claims of the coast colonies by extending the boundaries of the province of Quebec to the Ohio River on the south and to the Mississippi River on the west. [Source: Avalon Project at the Yale Law School]

It’s a puzzle of acorns from JigZone this Friday:

Related posts:

Leave a Reply